Being a Part of a Black Belt School – This is an Education not an Activity

Blocking, Kicking, And Punching Is Just The Beginning.

Martial arts is all about learning blocks, counters, punches, holds, and kicks, right? The answer is yes, but it’s also only the beginning. The goal of becoming a Black Belt is the goal of becoming a better human being. A martial arts education gives you the tools and a pathway to accomplish that and so very much more.

Crabapple Martial Arts Academy has these words stenciled boldly above the mat:

We are a Black Belt Academy

What does this mean? What is expected of students who belong to this exclusive school? Why do we call the karate schools “schools” at all?

Martial arts training centers go by many names. The words “dojo” (Japanese) and “dojang” (Korean) literally mean “place of the way” or “way place” and this is representative of the breadth of education delivered in these halls.  This is a place where the way of leadership, excellence, determination, self-discipline, focus, and martial arts is taught. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu training centers are often called “academies,” which again denotes a place of very specialized preparation.

Just like traditional education, parents want the best martial arts school for their kids. So you ask the same kinds of questions: What curriculum do they follow? Does the school teach leadership skills and philosophy along with academics? How educated are the teachers themselves? And maybe most importantly: What percentage of the school’s students graduate, and what have their graduates done? 

What Does The Top 1% Do That Others Do Not?

The top 1% of martial arts schools build a team and program around these concepts. Crabapple Martial Arts Academy employs a martial arts curriculum that traces its lineage to Grandmaster Dr. Steven Roensch, one of the most respected martial artists and teachers the modern world has ever known, the late Hanshi Ridgely Abele, and even to Grandmaster Robert Trias who is credited with pioneering Japanese martial arts in the United States. Through various programs (leadership book reviews, mat chats, requirements for volunteer and community service, worksheets, and newsletters that explore concepts like gratitude, courage, and humility), we teach students about history, how to help others, and the power of martial arts to create a more promising future.

That kind of well-rounded education is what we believe Black Belts should have, and it’s why we call Crabapple Martial Arts Academy a Black Belt Academy. So to get back to the starting question: What do we expect of all our new white belt students? That you’ll make it to Black Belt. As a Crabapple Martial Arts Academy student (or a parent of one), you can expect it, too.

 

In Budo,

C. Matthew White, Renshi
5th Degree Black Belt – Shintoyoshin Kai Jiu Jitsu
5th Degree Black Belt – Shuri Ryu Karatedo
Master Instructor

 

 

 

Crabapplemartialarts.com and Crabapple Martial Arts Academy has been selected the nation’s #1 martial arts schools for SIX YEARS IN A ROW by the American Budokai International!

Founded in 2013 by Mr. C. Matthew White a 5th degree Black Belt in Karate and 5th degree Black Belt in Jiu Jitsu, and Master Instructor, Crabapple Martial Arts and Karate lessons for pre-school children ages 4-6 and elementary age kids ages 7 and up are designed to develop the critical building blocks kids need – specialized for their age group – for school excellence and later success in life.

Crabapple Martial Arts Adult Karate training is a complete adult fitness and conditioning program for adults who want to lose weight, get (and stay in shape) or learn self-defense in a supportive environment.

Instructors can answer questions or be contacted 24 hours or the day, 7 days a week at office@crabapplemartialarts.com or call directly at 770-645-0930. You can also visit our website at CrabappleMartialArts.com.

About C. Matthew White, Renshi:  Matt is a fifth degree black belt in a traditional Japanese and Okinawan Martial Arts – Shuri Ryu Karatedo and also a fifth degree black belt in Japanese Jiu Jitsu – Shintoyoshin Kai Jiu Jitsu, and is a master instructor with a title of Renshi, which means Scholar in Japanese.  He has a bachelor’s degree in Exercise and Sports Physiology. He has been training and teaching martial arts for over 27 years and has owned Crabapple Martial Arts Academy since 2013. Renshi White is a motivational speaker and educator and teaches seminars in bullying, business, and martial arts training, around the world.

Crabapple Martial Arts Academy Headquarters is in Alpharetta, Georgia at 12315 Crabapple Road., Suite 124, Alpharetta GA 30004. You can locate the Chief Instructor, Sensei Randy Neese there directly at (770) 645-0930.

Karate Can Help Build a Kid’s Self-Esteem

Karate is an ancient martial arts style that was developed in the Ryukyu Islands in Japan. It grew into one of the most popular forms of martial arts worldwide several decades ago and still continues to be a favorite, especially with children. Along with teaching your kid self-defense and performance skills, it can help build your child’s self-esteem in the early formative years.

Karate and self-esteem

Self-esteem is the idea or “picture” we have of ourselves – who we are, what we’re capable of, and what we can be. It is built over time as we get to know ourselves through experience and feedback. It needs to be nurtured from a very young age for a kid to be able to grow into an adult who believes in himself or herself. Parents should take steps to ensure their children develop a positive self-image and self-respect. One of the most fun and effective ways to help children – even pre-schoolers – to develop a healthy level of self-esteem is through challenge and achievement in a structured physical and mental activity such as martial arts.

Karate has levels or ranks represented by belts of various colors and other uniform insignia. Each rank typically has a number of moves that must be learned to proceed to the next level. Forms (movement patterns) challenge students to memorize a sequence of techniques, targets, and direction changes at each rank. Free sparring or controlled combat against similarly-sized training partners (as well as seniors and teachers) helps students to fine-tune motor skills, reflexes, and strategic thinking.

This process of learning, practicing, competing with, and showcasing karate skills – starting at an early age – can have a tremendously positive effect on the self-esteem of practitioners.

  • Testing and advancing through ranks can be a memorable, confidence-boosting ‘personal victory’.
  • Praise and attention from instructors helps them feel good about themselves and their abilities to learn and achieve.
  • Not advancing in rank following an unsatisfactory testing performance (i.e. receiving a “no change”) encourages children to try harder and work to reach goals.
  • Scoring points or winning a free sparring bout gives students a sense of security and self- protection.
  • A properly executed form reinforces the self-esteem gained from incremental learning.

All this eventually leads to a better self-image and a positive attitude that endures throughout childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood.

Other benefits of karate for pre-schoolers and older kids


Besides helping build self-esteem and self-defense skills, karate can help nurture “tiny tots” in a number of other ways to help them become healthy, self-reliant, and responsible young people. Martial arts practitioners are known to improve these traits and others:

  • Discipline
  • Confidence
  • Physical fitness
  • Teamwork
  • Listening
  • Respect

Despite the popular misconception and hype portrayed in popular cinema, the martial arts are not strictly about violence. In fact, most martial artists learn to restrain their tempers and refrain from unleashing their powerful physical skills. Rather, martial arts offer a treasure trove of life lessons and tangible benefits for most students that reach far beyond the training facility to improve the lives of those who train and the lives of those around them.

Improve Your Child’s Self-Confidence with Karate

Karate is an ancient Japanese martial arts form that became popular worldwide during the 1960s, and today for the vast majority of non-martial artists, “karate” is synonymous with “martial arts.” It continues to be a popular discipline across the globe, especially among children and adolescents. Unlike some styles, karate is easy to teach and learn in segments that are age and fitness level appropriate. It’s also a powerful way to guide your kids into becoming confident, caring, and capable individuals.

Karate to boost self-confidence

Self-confidence is the ability to trust yourself and your abilities. For that, you need to first know what you are capable of physically, mentally, and emotionally. To know this, it is essential that you push your limits on a regular basis to see how much you can take. Pushing yourself just a little bit more each workout is the key to extending and expanding your capabilities over time. Since karate and some related martial art forms are essentially about self-improvement of mind, body, and spirit, training is a natural, reliable, and enjoyable way to gain self-confidence.

You can train your kids to practice pushing their limits from a young age, so they learn to give their best in every life situation. Get them started young, in their pre-school years if possible, to reap maximum benefits of karate. These early, formative years are important times for developing bodies and minds. Parents appreciate the physical fitness, good manners, and new friendships formed by their children being in karate.

Karate involves progression from one level to the next, each level corresponding to various
belt colors going from white to black. Each successive rank includes a number of simple and complex moves that must be learned and properly performed, with tests to be passed, to be graduated in rank and belt color. Classes also include free sparring in protective safety gear with peers and seniors to develop students’ self-defense skills.

Karate classes can help children know themselves better and build their self-confidence in many ways.

  • Passing a skill test gives a sense of accomplishment.
  • Sparring develops and tests strategy, speed, agility, and endurance.
  • Praise and positive feedback – and continual progress in the martial arts skills, visible in
    each student’s moves and techniques over time – are motivating results!
  • Getting to the next level and belt color can be a major milestone.
  • It can be a major tool against bullying, helping your kids defend themselves and be safe.

Knowing themselves and improving their abilities give your children the priceless gifts of self- confidence and self-reliance. They learn to have positive attitudes, goals, patience, and other virtues that are especially helpful when trying new things, dealing with problems and setbacks, and facing life’s challenges head-on.


Other benefits of learning karate

The fun practice of karate offers even more benefits to both children and adults who participate regularly. It can teach them many skills and instill leadership traits, in addition to improving their self-confidence.

  • Discipline
  • Physical fitness
  • Social skills
  • Respect
  • Listening
  • Self-esteem

Giving kids the opportunity to learn karate, or any martial arts form, might be the most formative, beneficial, and enduring gift you can give your child besides your love and care. Training, learning, winning, losing, and trying again through the interesting and motivating practice of karate will help them develop good habits and self-confidence. This often results in young people becoming positive, strong, responsible, and confident adults who are ready to take on life as leaders.

Building a Child’s Concentration

As an adult performing complex tasks, like studying in college or managing home finances, it is all too easy to take for granted the cognitive processes that go into performing them. The brainpower required to do complicated things develops rapidly through experience and practice, starting at a very young age. Improving children’s cognitive abilities can begin at the earliest stages of their sensory development.

Developing the ability to concentrate on particular tasks is absolutely critical for success in today’s over-stimulated, distracting environments, and those who do so at an early age have a leg up on their peers. By the time a child begins schooling, he or she needs to have developed cognitive ability that will allow him or her to perform tasks that may take a prolonged period of time. Consequently, developing focus and concentration at the pre-school level is very important. Here are some practical tips for parents to help their child or children develop concentration.

Creating a Plan

One of the best ways that a parent can go about measuring a child’s concentration levels is by creating a plan and a schedule. Over time, they should monitor their children and record whether and how much progress is being made. Once a plan has been created, parents should present logic or “thinking” tasks such as age-appropriate puzzles to their children, and encourage them to work on them for as long as possible.

Step By Step Approach

Initially, it is “normal” for a child may to have the ability to focus on a particular challenge for just a few minutes before giving up. However, parents should encourage their children to build their concentration, by ensuring that they stick to a task a little bit longer than they did in the past. This must be done in small steps to ensure that the child does not become exhausted or excessively frustrated. As time goes by, a child will naturally build concentration spans that hold them in good stead as they study further. It is also a good idea to get your toddler enrolled for karate classes. This will help in improving your child’s concentration power a great deal.

Rewards

It is also extremely important for children to feel rewarded for the work they have put into developing their mental faculties. Sincere and specific praise is a good example. At the next stage, parents might challenge their children to complete a puzzle, game, or task in a certain number of days while offering a greater incentive, such as the promise of a desirable toy or an
extra hour of television. Rewarding the child is entirely up to the parents as long as the reward is real and ultimately fulfilled when the challenge is complete.