Being a Part of a Black Belt School – This is an Education not an Activity

Blocking, Kicking, And Punching Is Just The Beginning.

Martial arts is all about learning blocks, counters, punches, holds, and kicks, right? The answer is yes, but it’s also only the beginning. The goal of becoming a Black Belt is the goal of becoming a better human being. A martial arts education gives you the tools and a pathway to accomplish that and so very much more.

Crabapple Martial Arts Academy has these words stenciled boldly above the mat:

We are a Black Belt Academy

What does this mean? What is expected of students who belong to this exclusive school? Why do we call the karate schools “schools” at all?

Martial arts training centers go by many names. The words “dojo” (Japanese) and “dojang” (Korean) literally mean “place of the way” or “way place” and this is representative of the breadth of education delivered in these halls.  This is a place where the way of leadership, excellence, determination, self-discipline, focus, and martial arts is taught. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu training centers are often called “academies,” which again denotes a place of very specialized preparation.

Just like traditional education, parents want the best martial arts school for their kids. So you ask the same kinds of questions: What curriculum do they follow? Does the school teach leadership skills and philosophy along with academics? How educated are the teachers themselves? And maybe most importantly: What percentage of the school’s students graduate, and what have their graduates done? 

What Does The Top 1% Do That Others Do Not?

The top 1% of martial arts schools build a team and program around these concepts. Crabapple Martial Arts Academy employs a martial arts curriculum that traces its lineage to Grandmaster Dr. Steven Roensch, one of the most respected martial artists and teachers the modern world has ever known, the late Hanshi Ridgely Abele, and even to Grandmaster Robert Trias who is credited with pioneering Japanese martial arts in the United States. Through various programs (leadership book reviews, mat chats, requirements for volunteer and community service, worksheets, and newsletters that explore concepts like gratitude, courage, and humility), we teach students about history, how to help others, and the power of martial arts to create a more promising future.

That kind of well-rounded education is what we believe Black Belts should have, and it’s why we call Crabapple Martial Arts Academy a Black Belt Academy. So to get back to the starting question: What do we expect of all our new white belt students? That you’ll make it to Black Belt. As a Crabapple Martial Arts Academy student (or a parent of one), you can expect it, too.

 

In Budo,

C. Matthew White, Renshi
5th Degree Black Belt – Shintoyoshin Kai Jiu Jitsu
5th Degree Black Belt – Shuri Ryu Karatedo
Master Instructor

 

 

 

Crabapplemartialarts.com and Crabapple Martial Arts Academy has been selected the nation’s #1 martial arts schools for SIX YEARS IN A ROW by the American Budokai International!

Founded in 2013 by Mr. C. Matthew White a 5th degree Black Belt in Karate and 5th degree Black Belt in Jiu Jitsu, and Master Instructor, Crabapple Martial Arts and Karate lessons for pre-school children ages 4-6 and elementary age kids ages 7 and up are designed to develop the critical building blocks kids need – specialized for their age group – for school excellence and later success in life.

Crabapple Martial Arts Adult Karate training is a complete adult fitness and conditioning program for adults who want to lose weight, get (and stay in shape) or learn self-defense in a supportive environment.

Instructors can answer questions or be contacted 24 hours or the day, 7 days a week at office@crabapplemartialarts.com or call directly at 770-645-0930. You can also visit our website at CrabappleMartialArts.com.

About C. Matthew White, Renshi:  Matt is a fifth degree black belt in a traditional Japanese and Okinawan Martial Arts – Shuri Ryu Karatedo and also a fifth degree black belt in Japanese Jiu Jitsu – Shintoyoshin Kai Jiu Jitsu, and is a master instructor with a title of Renshi, which means Scholar in Japanese.  He has a bachelor’s degree in Exercise and Sports Physiology. He has been training and teaching martial arts for over 27 years and has owned Crabapple Martial Arts Academy since 2013. Renshi White is a motivational speaker and educator and teaches seminars in bullying, business, and martial arts training, around the world.

Crabapple Martial Arts Academy Headquarters is in Alpharetta, Georgia at 12315 Crabapple Road., Suite 124, Alpharetta GA 30004. You can locate the Chief Instructor, Sensei Randy Neese there directly at (770) 645-0930.

A History of Taekwondo

A Korean martial art, Taekwondo is a combination of self-defense and combat skills. It is used as a form of defense and makes use of the whole body. It includes skillful application of techniques like dodges, blocks, kicks, and punches. For Taekwondo masters, the art is more than just a way to defend themselves when required. It is a way of life, which requires them to be completely dedicated to the art. It is more than just learning the fighting techniques, but more about developing their inner self with strict discipline. If you are interested in learning the powerful martial art that requires controlling both the mind and the body, search for Taekwondo schools, masters, styles and much more on Go2Taekwondo.com.

How did Taekwondo evolve?

Taekwondo is a combination of martial arts, most of which originated in Korea. Among the oldest disciplines, some of which are over 2,000 years old, that influenced the development of Taekwondo are Taek Kyon, Tae Kwonpup, Tae Kwon, T’ang-su, and Kwonpup. Use of circular hand movements influenced by Chinese martial arts can also be clearly seen in Taekwondo. It has also drawn inspiration from popular martial arts like Kung-fu (kicking techniques), Judo, and Karate (linear, abrupt movements).

The earliest mention of Taekwondo on record dates back to the time when Korea was divided into three kingdoms – Silla, Koguryo, and Paekche, around 50 B.C. Paintings of unarmed people from this period following modern day Taekwondo techniques are evidence of the origin of Taekwondo. The earliest known form of Taekwondo, Tae Kyon, is a self-defense art that uses kicks, hand strikes, throws, and joint locks.

Though Taekwondo was first practiced in the Koguryo kingdom, the credit of spreading the art form all over Korea goes to the Hwarang warriors belonging to Silla. From 668 A.D. To 935 A.D., Taek Kyon (which was later renamed as Subak) served as a system to promote fitness among the soldiers. However, it was later developed into a fighting art. Though the defense form was allowed to be taught to the public during the rule of Yi dynasty, it failed to generate enough interest and was practiced only in a few parts of the country.

Revival of the art

The interest of Koreans in Subak renewed when the country was invaded by the Japanese. When the Japanese banned the practice of military arts in Korea and banned Korean books as well as languages, Korean patriots formed groups and started practicing Subak along with other self-defense forms. Karate, Judo, and Kung-fu were introduced officially to the public in 1943. By 1945, Korea developed several variations of Subak. The first school to teach Taekwondo was said to have started in 1945 in Seoul. Though the U.S. first saw the glimpses of Subak in the 1950s, the U.S. Taekwondo Association was formed in 1967. It was later turned into the U.S. Taekwondo Federation. The American Taekwondo Association was founded in 1969 by Haeng Ung Lee, who premiered the Songahm
style of Taekwondo in 1983. The World Taekwondo Federation, founded in 1973, is an organization recognized as the official international Taekwondo governing body by the Korean government.

Are you interested in learning the highly disciplined art of Taekwondo in your area? You can simplify your search for Taekwondo schools and masters by looking for them on Go2Taekwondo.com.